The Yarmouth County Museum and Archives wants to fund the digitizing of newspapers in the Archives’ possessions. Some of the newspapers, dating back to 1836 (the first newspaper printed in Yarmouth), have become so fragile that they have been retired from research use. The hope is to preserve the newspapers by scanning them and placing the digital images online, then placing the paper copies into hermetically sealed storage to reduce further damage caused by frequent handling.

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

NOTE: This article has nothing to do with genealogy. If you are looking for genealogy-related articles, I suggest you skip this one. However, it answers a question that a newsletter reader asked and I suspect that many other readers have similar questions.

Several years ago, I published I Added Four Terabytes to My Personal Cloud at http://bit.ly/2hS5teP where I described my recent addition of a high-capacity networked disk drive to the local area network in my home.

The State Archives of North Carolina collects photographs as an important and popular part of the Archives’ mission. Proper identification is key to their accessibility and usefulness. A significant number of the photographs in the collections are only marginally labeled, and some are completely unknown. The State Archives is raising money via an IndieGoGo campaign to fund the work of local historian Karl Larson, who is instrumental in the research and identification of the unidentified photographs in the holdings.

The following announcement was written by the RootsTech organizers:

Olympic gold medalist Scott Hamilton will keynote RootsTech 2018

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (6 October 2017), RootsTech 2018 is delighted to announce that Scott Hamilton, American champion figure skater, Olympic gold medalist, motivational speaker, author, philanthropist, cancer survivor, TV broadcaster, and husband and father will be the RootsTech 2018 keynote speaker on Friday, March 2, 2018, in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Atlas Obscura web site has an interesting article about Basque immigrants to the United States. The article begins:

“Some Americans, to learn about their ancestors, can dig through documents detailing when they passed through Ellis Island or flew in or got married, or where they lived at the time of a census. But for some Basque families in the United States, the only record they have of their immigrant ancestors is carved into trees in secluded aspen groves throughout the West.

The animated television series South Park is taking a shot at white people who feel they are oppressed by an overly politically correct society.

In a preview for Wednesday’s episode “Holiday Special,” Randy watches a commercial for a web site that claims to help Caucasians identity their genealogy, DNA and Me, which leads them to feel oppressed once they discover a small percentage of minority ancestry.

This is an update to an article I published last year on 1 November 2016, still available at: http://bit.ly/2wRWxwK. There have been major changes since that article was published.

The Library of Virginia’s web site now states that the Reading Rooms are now open again to researchers Monday through Saturday, 9:00 AM until 5:00 PM. Details are available at: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/about/visit.asp.

The reason for the changes is that the General Assembly last winter reduced some of the budget cutbacks that were experienced last fall.

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