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John Grenham MAGI FIGRSRegular readers of Irish Genealogy News will remember my blogpost about the National Archives of Ireland 's project to (finally) tackle the backlog of corrections submitted by email by researchers who had identified errors, mainly of transcription, in the online 1901/1911 Irish census collections.

The tender for the project, which will last for about a year, was issued in June and yesterday the well-known genealogist John Grenham MAGI announced on his blog that he is the lucky chap now up to his elbows in these emails and making appropriate amendments to the database.

ESB Archives has provided a free curio of information to add to your research into the lives of your more recent ancestors and family: an interactive map where you can discover when electricity reached more than 1,300 villages, towns and parishes across the Republic of Ireland.

Connection to Ireland's electricity network transformed our families' lives, but the rollout took nearly 50 years.

NOTE:This has nothing to do with today’s genealogy. However, Florida residents are invited to help preserve the history of the state and to record events that perhaps will benefit future historians and possibly even future genealogists.

The Florida State Archives is asking residents to preserve hurricane history by donating your digital images of preparation, damage, volunteers, shelters, recovery and other effects of Hurricane Irma. The donated photographs will join past photos of Camille, Andrew, and Charley as one of many hurricanes that have shaped Florida’s history.

New GPS (Global Positioning System) chips will be used in future cell phones that will be accurate within 30 centimeters (11.8 inches), rather than five meters (16 feet) which is typical of today’s cell phones. At least, that’s the claim chip maker Broadcom is making. While this may not seem at first to be significant for genealogists, it should greatly improve the accuracy of locations recorded with a cell phone and its camera.

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Irish Genealogical Research Society:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS) has added a further 5,000 records to the Society’s Early Irish Birth, Marriage and Death Indexes. This brings the total number of names to almost 260,000.

This latest update means the Society’s exclusive collection of lesser used and obscure sources for Irish births, marriages and deaths now comprises a total of 24,500 births (noting 47,800 names), 83,600 marriages (186,800 names) and 16,800 deaths (24,500 names).

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS) has added a further 5,000 records to its exclusive Early Irish Birth, Marriage and Death Indexes. This brings the total number of names in the collection to just under 260,000.

Originating from lesser used and obscure sources of Irish births, marriages and deaths, the indexes now comprise a total of 24,500 births (noting 47,800 names), 83,600 marriages (186,800 names) and 16,800 deaths (24,500 names).

Monday 25 September to Friday 29 September:Return to the Causeway: A journey into the past, a week-long conference. Host: Causeway Coast and Glens Branch of the North of Ireland Family History Society. Venue: Atlantic Hotel, Portrush, Co Antrim. Details. Day tickets available.

Monday 25 September:NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. On-going Monday closures are to facilitate extensive redevelopment of the premises.

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