There's a call out for volunteers to help with the photographing of headstones and recording of memorial inscriptions in the pre-Reformation Kilrush Churchyard in County Clare.

The volunteer team, organised by Kilrush & District Historical Society, will be working in the churchyard today, Wednesday and Thursday from noon until 4pm, conducting the second stage of a project to survey and map the burial ground. The work involves the use of digital cameras, hi-tech GPS systems, and low-tech carbon rubbing techniques.

The following is for U.S. residents only:

There are 325,060,629 people in the U.S.

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To find out, go to http://HowManyOfMe.com and enter your own name.

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I often write about bad news in which legislators and bureaucrats keep blocking genealogists from accessing records that legally qualify as public domain. Therefore, it is great to report another victory from Reclaim The Records!

An announcement from Reclaim The Records states:

“After seventeen months of work, we have now forced the New York State Department of Health to concede that this data is, and should be, available to the public under open records laws.

I often write about bad news in which legislators and bureaucrats keep blocking genealogists from accessing records that legally qualify as public domain. Therefore, it is great to report another victory from Reclaim The Records!

An announcement from Reclaim The Records states:

“After seventeen months of work, we have now forced the New York State Department of Health to concede that this data is, and should be, available to the public under open records laws.

There is a heartwarming story concerning DNA in the Goo0d4Utah web site today. How a Utah Woman Met Her Birth Mother After 43 Years describes how an adoptee reunited with her birth mother 43 years after being put up for adoption. The discovery of the birth mother was all due to their DNA, a test by MyHeritage, and a little bit of fate.

The story is available at: http://bit.ly/2tdYr4u.

Monday 12 June:Hermann Görtz, a German spy in Ireland during WW2, with James Scannell. Host: Clontarf Historical Society. Venue: Resource Centre, St John the Baptist Church. Clontarf Road, Dublin 3. Admission €5. All welcome. 8:15pm.

Tuesday 13 June:Irish Family History Group, monthly meeting. Host and venue: The Core Library, Theatre Square, Homer Road, Solihull, UK, B91 3RG. 10am to Noon. All welcome to attend for free genealogy help and support.

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