A woman who was taken and put up for adoption by Irish nuns spent 44 years trying to track down her birth mother.

She was born in the notorious Bessborough home in County Cork where protests have been held and calls made to remember all the unmarried mothers and children who passed through there.

Catherine Deasy was separated from her mother by the nuns of the Bessborough Sacred Heart Convent in Cork as soon as she was born.

After 149 years, an Irish immigrant is finally found not guilty of murder.

August 30 marked the 149th anniversary of an unfortunate day for justice in New Jersey.

Bridget Deignan (sometimes misspelled Durgan) was hanged in New Brunswick in 1867.

Bridget was a twenty-two-year-old illiterate, indigent immigrant from Sligo who was essentially exported from Ireland by wealthy, British landowners who saw the poor and uneducated as an economic burden.

When you work for an Irish American publication, there are a few figures you have committed to memory: The global Irish diaspora is 70 million worldwide; the population of Ireland is 4.5 million; there are 36.9 million Americans of Irish descent.

Those were the numbers to know when I first started writing for IrishCentral’s sister publication Irish America magazine back in 2010. Since then, the global Irish diaspora (which is, granted, a more abstract approximation) has stayed the same, and the population of Ireland has increased to 4.76 million.

Names in the popular database of Irish census records dating from 1901 and 1911 were mistranscribed by a Canadian archival and library institute, claims the London Times.

The Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) was contacted by the National Archives of Ireland in 2006 and asked to undertake the mammoth task of digitizing the information and data from the first two Irish censuses to be taken at the start of the 20th century, a massive genealogy resource for interested parties worldwide who wish to explore their family’s roots in Ireland.

Names in the popular database of Irish census records dating from 1901 and 1911 were mistranscribed by a Canadian archival and library institute, claims the London Times.

The Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) was contacted by the National Archives of Ireland in 2006 and asked to undertake the mammoth task of digitizing the information and data from the first two Irish censuses to be taken at the start of the 20th century, a massive genealogy resource for interested parties worldwide who wish to explore their family’s roots in Ireland.

Journalist Poul Christensen gør sine lokalhistoriske artikler fra Nordvestfyn tilgængelige for alle på ny hjemmeside.

Nu bliver de mere end 40 artikler om den nordvestfynske lokalhistorie tilgængelige for alle. Poul Christensen har oprettet hjemmesiden www.poulc-strib.dk, og hvis man klikker sig ind på den, får man adgang til hovedparten af hans artikler.

Editor’s note: Paula Kennedy is among locals in Galway working on the Mountbellew Workhouse Project to trace the descendants of the Irish emigrants who traveled on board the Palestine ship to Australia in 1853. On board were 33 Mountbellew workhouse orphan girls. The project is trying to connect with as many of the orphan workhouse girls' descendants in Australia in the hope of telling the girls' stories, establishing where they came from in Galway and, hopefully, connecting with their Irish cousins.

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