What’s in a name?

Turns out, it’s a demonstrably better user experience.

At least that was the case for the savvy consumer targeters at Ancestry.com, when they decided to make the shift from obligatory forms of programmatic retargeting -- you know, the kind that leads to banner blindness and, how shall we say, less-than-desirable user experiences.

Happy Birthday Gene Kelly! Today (Aug 23) in 1912 Eugene Curran "Gene" Kelly was born in Pittsburgh to an Irish Canadian father and an Irish German mother. It wasn’t’ until much later in life that he was issued an Irish passport, which made him extremely proud, according to his wife.

The American dancer, actor, singer, film director, producer, and choreographer, best known for his performances in movies such as An American in Paris and Singing in the Rain is credited with making his ballet form commercially acceptable to movie audiences.

Happy Birthday Gene Kelly! Today (Aug 23) in 1912 Eugene Curran "Gene" Kelly was born in Pittsburgh to an Irish Canadian father and an Irish German mother. It wasn’t’ until much later in life that he was issued an Irish passport, which made him extremely proud, according to his wife.

The American dancer, actor, singer, film director, producer, and choreographer, best known for his performances in movies such as An American in Paris and Singing in the Rain is credited with making his ballet form commercially acceptable to movie audiences.

An international team of researchers are studying what types of foods our ancient ancestors ate in Ireland during the Iron Age.

The Irish Times reports that archaeologists are using data and artifacts discovered from commercial digs during the Celtic Tiger period to determine the dietary habits of people in the south east of Ireland between 2,700 and 2,000 years ago.

UCC archaeology lecturer Dr Katharina Becker and her colleagues have used pollen grains from cultivated plants which have been trapped at the core of a Kilkenny lake that is 11,000 years old to radiocarbon date items collected to give an indication of their age.

An international team of researchers is studying what types of foods our ancient ancestors ate in Ireland during the Iron Age.

Archaeologists are using data and artifacts discovered from commercial digs during the Celtic Tiger years to learn about the dietary habits of people in the southeast of Ireland between 2,700 and 2,000 years ago.

UCC archaeology lecturer Dr Katharina Becker and her colleagues are able to use pollen grains from cultivated plants which have been trapped at the core of a Kilkenny lake to get an indication of their age through radiocarbon dating.

The first day of the annual Northwest Genealogy Conference drew more than 200 attendees to the Byrnes Performing Arts Center Wednesday, but conference chairwoman Kathy Reece Stuehrenberg expects the event's total attendance to top out at more than 300 by its final day Aug. 20.

"We're focusing more on family histories and stories this year," Stuehrenberg said.

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