An international team of researchers are studying what types of foods our ancient ancestors ate in Ireland during the Iron Age.

The Irish Times reports that archaeologists are using data and artifacts discovered from commercial digs during the Celtic Tiger period to determine the dietary habits of people in the south east of Ireland between 2,700 and 2,000 years ago.

UCC archaeology lecturer Dr Katharina Becker and her colleagues have used pollen grains from cultivated plants which have been trapped at the core of a Kilkenny lake that is 11,000 years old to radiocarbon date items collected to give an indication of their age.

An international team of researchers is studying what types of foods our ancient ancestors ate in Ireland during the Iron Age.

Archaeologists are using data and artifacts discovered from commercial digs during the Celtic Tiger years to learn about the dietary habits of people in the southeast of Ireland between 2,700 and 2,000 years ago.

UCC archaeology lecturer Dr Katharina Becker and her colleagues are able to use pollen grains from cultivated plants which have been trapped at the core of a Kilkenny lake to get an indication of their age through radiocarbon dating.

The first day of the annual Northwest Genealogy Conference drew more than 200 attendees to the Byrnes Performing Arts Center Wednesday, but conference chairwoman Kathy Reece Stuehrenberg expects the event's total attendance to top out at more than 300 by its final day Aug. 20.

"We're focusing more on family histories and stories this year," Stuehrenberg said.

A descendant of one of the 4,000 Irish orphan girls sent to Australia during the Great Hunger is calling for a memorial in Carrick-on-Shannon.

Thousands of young Irish women were sent from overcrowded workhouses in Ireland to Australia under the “Earl Grey Scheme” which lasted from 1848 to 1850. The maneuver was named after the son of the famous tea merchant who as secretary of state for the new British colonies designed the scheme to correct the gender imbalance caused by the transportation of convicts.

“Ancestral travel is a way of connecting oneself with their progenitors and finding one’s rootedness in a confusing and fast-paced world,” Dallen J. Timothy, a professor at Arizona State University and editor of The Journal of Heritage Tourism, wrote in an email.

The sentiment crosses many ethnic groups.

The motivations of those who make these trips vary, as does what they find.

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